In 2015 (aka next year) SpiderOak is dropping their prices! Which is a good thing for us who are concern with privacy.

The new prices are as following (and even cheaper if you opt-in for the yearly plan):

  • 30GB for $7
  • 1TB for $12
  • 5TB for $25

These prices will not be made “public” before some time next year, but with the pricing2015 promo code you can start the upload fun now!

For those of you that don’t know what SpiderOak stands for:

SpiderOak provides the ability to utilize cloud technologies while retaining that precious right we call privacy. Our ‘zero-knowledge’ privacy environment ensures only you can see your data. No one else can gain access. Not our staff. Not a government. This orientation makes it impossible for us to betray your trust.

About the Asus USB-N14 Wireless-N300 adapter

Some of you know that I’m running Ubuntu at home (and at work, most of the time). So when I bought a new computer two weeks ago (have forgotten to blog about that (stay tuned)), I needed a USB wifi adapter as the motherboard dindn’t have an integrated one. I forgot to search high and low before ordering, so I just took the newest Asus (as I have an Asus router) adapter that had a fair price.

The Asus USB-N14 Wireless-N300 USB Adapter (that is one long name) did (not surprisingly) not work out of the box on Ubuntu 14.04. So I downloaded the driver using my phone and extracted it to my computer, but when I tried to compile the code I always got two compile errors. So after a lot of googling and trying to fix the error I just have up.

So I decided to send it back and order a new one. I went for the little sibling USB-N13 Wireless-N300 Adapter, this was mostly because most of the answers that I tried for myy N14 where reported to work with the N13. So when I hooked it up it was detected automagically by my computer, but of course couldn’t use it to use the internet. It would only connect. So I went to my backup plan and followed these simple steps (that are taken from this GitHub-page

Ensure you have the necessary prerequisites installed:

sudo apt-get install linux-headers-generic build-essential dkms

Clone this repository:

git clone

Set it up as a DKMS module:

sudo dkms add ./rtl8192cu-fixes

Build and install it (the version at the end may be updated, so double check with the git repo to be sure):

sudo dkms install 8192cu/1.9

Refresh the module list:

sudo depmod -a

Ensure the native (and broken) kernel driver is blacklisted:

sudo cp ./rtl8192cu-fixes/blacklist-native-rtl8192.conf /etc/modprobe.d/

And reboot. You’re done.

Thanks to P. Varet!